Statistical Bulletins

On this page you can view and download all of the statistical bulletins that were published for 'Release 1' and 'Release 2'.

The Release 2B Statistical Bulletin and the associated tables, and the combined Release 2 Statistical Bulletin, were updated on 6 November 2014 to correct for the error discovered in the coding specifications for Industry (notified on 16 October 2014). Further information is available from the Revisions and Corrections page.

The contents of the statistical bulletins for Releases 2A, 2B, 2C and 2D have now been combined into a single documents for ease of reference. You can see the combined Statistical Bulletin by using the following link:-Release 2 Statistical Bulletin - PDF (Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format) (2547 Kb)

National Statistics Quality Mark logoRelease 2D - 9 April 2014

Release 2D provides information on Long-term Health Conditions, Central Heating and Deprivation. You can see the Statistical Bulletin relating to this by using the following link:-

Release 2D Statistical Bulletin - PDF (Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format) (596 Kb)

(Updated on 15 May 2014 - See Revisions and Corrections for details.)

A range of figures and tables from Release 2D are available to download.

Key Points are available in our News release.

Release 2C - 18 December 2013

Release 2C provides information on Living Arrangements. You can see the Statistical Bulletin relating to this release by using the following link:-

Release 2C Statistical Bulletin - PDF (Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format) (405 Kb)

A range of figures and tables from Release 2C are available to download.

Key Points are available in our News release.

Release 2B - 14 November 2013

Release 2B provides information on Education and Labour Market. You can see the Statistical Bulletin relating to this release by using the following link:-

Release 2B Statistical Bulletin - PDF (Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format) (313 Kb)

A range of figures and tables from Release 2B are available to download.

Key Points are available in our News release.

Release 2A - 26 September 2013

Release 2A provides information on:-

  • Population
  • Ethnicity, Identity, Language, Religion
  • Health
  • Housing & Accommodation

You can see the Statistical Bulletin relating to this release by using the following link:-

Release 2A Statistical Bulletin - PDF (Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format) (1098 Kb)

(Updated on 15 May 2014 - See Revisions and Corrections for details.)

A range of figures and tables from Release 2A are available to download.

Key Points are available in our News release.

Release 1C (part two) - 15 August 2013

Further results from the 2011 Census in Scotland are now available. The second part of Release 1C provides unrounded estimates of the usually resident population and number of households with at least one usual resident for postcodes, Output Areas, Datazones and inhabited islands in Scotland.

This document is available as:

Release 1C (part two) Statistical Bulletin - PDF (Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format) (123 Kb)

A range of figures and tables are available to download.

Release 1C (part one) - 23 July 2013

Further results from the 2011 Census in Scotland are now available. Release 1C (part one) provides:-

  • unrounded estimates of the usually resident population of Scotland and each Council and Health Board Area on Census day, by single year of age and sex;
  • unrounded estimates of the number of households in each council area, by size of household; and
  • unrounded estimates of the usually resident population of Scotland and each council area on Census day, by whether living in a household or communal establishment.

This document is available as:

Release 1C Statistical Bulletin - PDF (Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format) (201 Kb)

A range of figures and tables are available to download.

Release 1B - 21 March 2013

Release 1B provides:

  • usually resident census population estimates (rounded to the nearest 100) for Scotland, by five-year age bands and sex
  • usually resident census population estimates (rounded to the nearest 100) for each council area, by five-year age bands and sex; and
  • estimates of number of households (rounded to the nearest 10) for Scotland and each council area.

This document is available as:

Release 1B Statistical Bulletin - PDF (Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format) (2Mb)

A range of figures and tables are available to download.

Main points - Release 1B

  • Population
  • The population of Scotland on census day in 2011 was estimated to be 5,295,400 - the highest ever.
  • There were more women (2,728,000 or 51.5 per cent) than men (2,567,400 or 48.5 per cent) in Scotland. This was the case for all council areas except for Shetland Islands.
    Age structure.
  • In 2011, 17 per cent of the population were aged 65 and over. This percentage ranges from 14 per cent in West Lothian to 22 per cent in Argyll & Bute.
    Age comparisons with 10 years ago
  • Since 2001, the number of children aged under 5 years in Scotland has increased by 6 per cent. This change has not been uniform throughout the country. In the City of Edinburgh the increase was 18 per cent whilst there was a reduction of 11 per cent in Argyll & Bute.
  • The number of people aged 80 and over has increased by 19 per cent since 2011. All council areas have seen rises but this ranges from a 3 per cent increase in Glasgow City to a 44 per cent increase in East Dunbartonshire.
    Households
  • 98 per cent of Scotland's 5,295,400 population lived in households in 2011 with the remaining 2 per cent living in communal establishments, such as university halls of residence, prisons and care homes.
  • The number of households in Scotland with at least one usual resident on census day in 2011 was estimated to be 2,372,780 - the highest ever.
  • The average household size in Scotland was 2.19 people per household and ranged from 2.02 in Glasgow City to 2.42 in East Renfrewshire.
    Household comparisons with 10 years ago
  • Since 2001 the number of households in Scotland increased by 180,530 (8 per cent ) from 2,192,250. All council areas saw increases with the largest increases in Orkney Islands (17 per cent), Aberdeenshire (15 per cent) and Highland (14 per cent).
  • Between 2001 and 2011 the number of households increased faster than the number of people in households in all areas of Scotland. This has led to a decrease in average household size from 2.27 to 2.19 people per household.
  • In 1961, one-person households were the least common household type and accounted for 14 per cent of all households. By 2011 they had become the most common household type and accounted for 35 per cent of all households.

The Statistical Bulletin provides the main report and commentary on these results and includes:

  • Changes between 2001 and 2011 in the age profile of the population in different parts of Scotland
  • Council area populations; age and sex profiles
  • Council area dependency ratios
  • Number of households in Scotland and change in household size between 2001 and 2011

All key terms used in this publication, such as usual residents, are explained in the 2011 Census Glossary.

Release 1A - 17 December 2012

Release 1A provides estimates (rounded to the nearest thousand) of the usually resident population of Scotland on Census Day, broken down by age and sex. Also provided are estimates of the total usually resident population in each council area (rounded to the nearest thousand). This document is available in:

Statistical Bulletin - PDF (Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format) (511 Kb)

A range of figures and tables are available to download.

Main points - Release 1A

  • Scotland's population at 27 March 2011 was 5,295,000, the highest ever recorded population for Scotland.
  • There were 2,567,000 men and 2,728,000 women.
  • The population per square kilometre ranged from 9 in Eilean Siar and Highland to 3,395 in Glasgow City.

This document provides the main report and commentary on these results and includes:

  • 2011 Census Day population results
  • Population change over time
    • long-term trends
    • the last 100 years
    • trends in dependency and sex ratios
  • Population density for council areas
  • Scotland's population in an international context

All key terms used in this publication, such as usual residents, are explained in the 2011 Census Glossary.