Origin Destination - Key Points

Origin Destination - Key Points

UK Census statistics published 25th July 2014 by the Office for National Statistics here present details on movement of people travelling to their workplace address, cross-tabulated by sex, age and method of travel to work.

NRS have summarised some key points relating to Scotland which are provided below.

Key points

Location of usual residence and place of work by sex (Additional tables AT_009_2011, AT_010_2011, AT_011_2011)

  • Of the 2.00 million people aged 16 and over who travelled to work in Scotland at the time of the 2011 Census, 68 per cent worked in the same council area as they were resident. This proportion varied considerably by council area, ranging from 45 per cent in East Renfrewshire and 49 per cent in Glasgow and East Dunbartonshire to 95 per cent or more in the Orkney, Shetland, Eilean Siar and the Highland council areas. This will depend on a number of factors, including the available employment in an area, available workforce in neighbouring authorities and the geographical size and transport infrastructure of the area.
  • In terms of the gender distribution of the workplace population in each council area, the proportion which was male varied from 54 per cent in Aberdeen City and Argyll & Bute (which is likely to be related to employment in the oil industry and armed forces respectively) down to 39 per cent in East Renfrewshire.
  • The council areas with the highest net inflow of workers were Glasgow City (117,000), City of Edinburgh (69,000), Aberdeen City (42,000) and Dundee City (15,000). The three council areas with the highest net outflow of workers were Aberdeenshire (31,000), South Lanarkshire (25,000) and East Renfrewshire (20,000).
  • Just under 29,000 people whose workplace address was in Scotland were resident elsewhere in the United Kingdom. This represented 1.5 per cent of all people who travelled to work in Scotland.
  • The council areas with the highest levels of their workplace population from outside Scotland were Midlothian, Argyll & Bute and North Ayrshire (each at 4 per cent), followed by Angus, Borders and Dumfries and Galloway (each at 3 per cent).
  • Of the 1.97 million people aged 16 and over who lived in Scotland and travelled to work, 17,000 (0.9 per cent) worked outwith Scotland but elsewhere in the United Kingdom.

Location of usual residence and place of work by age (Additional tables AT_012_2011, AT_013_2011)

  • The proportion of the workplace population who were aged 16 to 34 was highest in Glasgow City (40 per cent, 131,000), Aberdeen City (40 per cent, 56,000), City of Edinburgh (39 per cent, 102,000), Stirling (37 per cent, 15,000) and Dundee City (37 per cent, 11,000).
  • The age groups with the highest proportion of people living in one council area and working in another were 35 to 49 year olds (33 per cent, 244,000), and 25 to 34 year olds (32 per cent, 136,000). This proportion was lowest for people aged 65 and over (25 per cent, 11,000).
  • The proportion of people working in Scotland who lived elsewhere in the UK is highest for 16 to 34 year olds (2 per cent, 11,000).

Location of usual residence and place of work by method of travel to work (Additional tables AT_014_2011)

  • The council areas with the highest proportions of the workplace population who travelled to work by bus, minibus or coach were City of Edinburgh (27 per cent, 70,000), Glasgow City (19 per cent, 61,000), Dundee City (16 per cent, 11,000) and Aberdeen City (13 per cent, 18,000).
  • Glasgow City has the highest proportion of the workplace population who travelled to work by train (17 per cent, 54,000), followed by City of Edinburgh (7 per cent, 17,000) and West Dunbartonshire (6 per cent, 2,000).
  • The council areas with the highest proportions of the workplace population who travelled to work by bicycle were City of Edinburgh (4 per cent, 10,000), Moray (4 per cent, 1,000) and Highland (3 per cent, 3,000).
  • The council areas with the highest proportions of their workplace population who travelled to work by driving a car or van were West Lothian (73 per cent, 47,000), Falkirk (72 per cent, 36,000) and Clackmannanshire (72 per cent, 9,000).

Notes:

1. The analysis above relates to people aged 16 and over in employment who travelled to a workplace address in Scotland at the time of the 2011 Census. The figures include full-time students in employment. The analysis excludes people who worked at home (277,000), had no fixed place of work (242,000), worked offshore (19,000) or worked outside the UK (8,000).

2. Background data relating to these key points has been published and is available on the Origin-Destination page. http://www.scotlandscensus.gov.uk/origin-destination