Census 2011: Release 3K - Detailed characteristics on Housing and Accommodation in Scotland

Census 2011: Release 3K - Detailed characteristics on Housing and Accommodation in ScotlandNational Statistics Quality Mark logo

The statistics published today by the Registrar General for Scotland on the Scotland’s Census website (http://www.scotlandscensus.gov.uk ) present further details on housing and accommodation (Release 3K), from national to local level.

Key points - Release 3K

 

Living arrangements of full-time students by tenure by age

 

·         At the time of the 2011 Census, just over half (52 per cent) of the 361,000 schoolchildren and full-time students aged 16 and over in Scotland lived with their parents. A further 17 per cent lived in all-student households, 6 per cent lived alone, 10 per cent in a household with their spouse, partner and/or children, 5 per cent in other types of households and 10 per cent in communal establishments such as university halls of residence.

 

·         The proportion of students who lived with their parents decreased with age: it was 96 per cent for those aged 16 or 17 and 10 per cent for those aged 25 and over.

 

·         Almost three quarters (74 per cent) of the 186,000 schoolchildren and full-time students aged 16 and over who lived with their parents were in households that owned their property. In contrast, 87 per cent of the 63,000 people in all-student households lived in private rented accommodation, while this proportion was 56 per cent for the 22,000 students who lived alone. The proportion of students who lived in communal establishments was highest for those aged 18 or 19, at 21 per cent.

 

Length of residence in the UK by number of rooms

 

  • A total of 348,000 people living in households in Scotland in 2011 were born outside the UK. The proportion of these people in households occupying five or more rooms increased with length of residence in the UK: it was 37 per cent for those resident for less than two years and 66 per cent for those resident for ten years or more.

 

Tenure by occupancy rating1 by household composition

 

  • In 2011, 9 per cent (214,000) of the 2.4 million household spaces in Scotland had an occupancy rating of -1 or less, implying they were overcrowded based on the notional number of rooms required for the people who lived there. This proportion was 5 per cent (67,000) for households who owned their property, 16 per cent (93,000) for households in social rented accommodation and 17 per cent (54,000) for households in private rented accommodation.

 

  • Of households comprising a family with dependent children, the proportion which were overcrowded was 23 per cent (33,000) for households in social rented accommodation and 17 per cent (13,000) for households in private rented accommodation.

 

  • Just over a third (35 per cent or 17,000) of households in the ‘other household type’ category in private rented accommodation were overcrowded. The corresponding proportion for social rented accommodation was 43 per cent (10,000 households).  (The ‘other household type’ category includes households with two or more usual residents and comprising all-student households,  one family with others – e.g. more than two generations living together - or households of unrelated adults.)

 

Household composition by type of central heating in household

 

  • In 2011, 2 per cent of the 2.4 million households in Scotland had no central heating. This proportion was slightly higher for persons aged under 65 living alone (5 per cent) and for all-student households (4 per cent).

 

Central heating by occupancy rating and ethnic group of Household Reference Person

 

·         In 2011, the proportion of households with no central heating was 5 per cent  for overcrowded households. It was also 5 per cent for households where the Household Reference Person was from a minority ethnic group.

 

The tables of census results covered in Release 3K are listed below. They are a mixture of “Detailed Characteristics” (DC) and “Local Characteristics” (LC) tables. DC versions of tables include the most complex cross-tabulations and are therefore not available at smaller geographic areas (generally available down to postcode sectors). LC versions of tables include less complex cross-tabulations and are therefore available down to the lowest geographic levels (generally census output areas). In some instances, no LC version of a table is produced as a statistical disclosure control measure. Similarly, the DC version of some tables is produced for council areas only.

 

[1] Occupancy rating provides a measure of whether a household’s accommodation is overcrowded or under-occupied in relation to the notional number of rooms required by those who live there. An occupancy rating of -1 means that there is one room too few for the people living in the household. In contrast, an occupancy rating of +1 means that there is one room more than required for the people living in the household. The occupancy rating is calculated by subtracting the notional number of rooms required from the actual number of rooms. In deriving the notional number of rooms a household requires, a standard formula is used which takes account of the ages of the household members and their relationships to each other. Further details on the standard formula are provided on the Scotland's Census website.

Tables included in Release 3K

DC1402SC Living arrangements by tenure by age of student
DC1403SC Household composition by type of central heating in household
LC1403SC Household composition by type of central heating in household
DC2410SC Length of residence in the UK by number of rooms
LC2410SC Length of residence in the UK by number of rooms
DC3403SC General health by long-term health problem or disability by occupancy rating (rooms) by age
LC3403SC General health by long-term health problem or disability by occupancy rating (rooms)
DC4104SC Tenure by occupancy rating (rooms) by household composition
LC4104SC Occupancy rating (rooms) by household composition
DC4106SC Tenure by occupancy rating (rooms)
LC4106SC Tenure by occupancy rating (rooms)
DC4304SC Type of central heating in household by general health by long-term health problem or disability
LC4304SC Type of central heating in household by general health by long-term health problem or disability
LC4404SC Tenure by household size by number of rooms
DC4406SC Tenure by number of persons per room in household by accommodation type
LC4406SC Tenure by number of persons per room in household by accommodation type
DC4410SC Type of central heating in household by occupancy rating (rooms) by age
LC4410SC Type of central heating in household by occupancy rating (rooms) by age
DC4418SC Type of central heating in household by occupancy rating (rooms) by ethnic group of Household Reference Person (HRP)
LC4418SC Type of central heating in household by occupancy rating (rooms) by ethnic group of Household Reference Person (HRP)
DC4420SC Type of central heating in household by occupancy rating (rooms) by ethnic group
LC4420SC Type of central heating in household by occupancy rating (rooms) by ethnic group
DC4426SC Tenure by type of central heating in household by household composition
LC4426SC Tenure by type of central heating in household by household composition
LC4601SC Tenure by economic activity – Household Reference Persons (HRPs)
LC4605SC Tenure by National Statistics Socio-economic Classification (NS-SeC) – Household Reference Persons (HRPs)
DC6216SC Industry by ethnic group by sex
LC6604SC Occupation by industry

All the data contained in this release can be accessed on the Scotland’s Census website (http://www.scotlandscensus.gov.uk ).