Census 2011: Release 3F - Detailed characteristics on Health in Scotland

Census 2011: Release 3F - Detailed characteristics on Health in ScotlandNational Statistics Quality Mark logo

The statistics published today by the Registrar General for Scotland on the Scotland’s Census website (http://www.scotlandscensus.gov.uk ) present further details on health (Release 3F), from national to local level.

Key points - Release 3F

General health by sex by age

· In the 2011 Census, 82 per cent (4.4 million) of Scotland’s population reported their general health as being “Very good” or “Good”, 12 per cent (645,000) as “Fair” and 6 per cent (297,000) as “Bad” or “Very bad”. The proportion reporting their general health as “Very good” or “Good” decreased with age: it was 97 per cent for those aged under 25 compared to 48 per cent and 35 per cent respectively for those aged 75 to 84 and aged 85 and over. Conversely, the proportion of the population reporting their general health as “Bad” or “Very bad” increased with age: it was less than 1 per cent for those aged under 25 compared to 15 per cent and 19 per cent respectively for those aged 75 to 84 and aged 85 and over.

· The profile of general health reported in the census was broadly similar for males and females, though males in the 25 to 49 and 75 and over age groups reported better health on average than females.

Long-term health problem or disability by sex by age

  • In 2011, 20 per cent (1.0 million) of Scotland’s population reported that their day to day activities were limited by a long-term health problem or disability, including 10 per cent (506,000) who said their activities were limited a lot. As with general health, this proportion increased with age: while just 5 per cent of those aged under 25 had a limiting long-term health problem or disability (including 2 per cent who were limited a lot), the corresponding proportion for those aged 85 and over was 83 per cent (including 54 per cent who were limited a lot).

  • The proportion of people with a limiting long-term health problem or disability was higher for females than for males at all age groups except for those aged under 25.

Long-term health conditions by sex by age

  • While 12 per cent of those aged under 25 reported one or more categories of health condition in the 2011 Census, this proportion was 72 per cent for those aged 75 to 84 and 87 per cent for those aged 85 and over.

  • The proportions of the population reporting deafness or partial hearing loss, blindness or partial sight loss and a physical disability all increased with age. For the 85 and over age group these proportions were 49 per cent, 25 per cent and 35 per cent respectively. In contrast, the proportions of the population with a learning disability, learning difficulty or developmental disorder were highest for those aged under 25, at 1 per cent, 3 per cent and 2 per cent respectively. The age groups with the highest proportion with a mental health condition were people aged 35 to 49 and aged 85 and over, at 7 per cent and 10 per cent respectively.

  • The proportions of the population with specific categories of long-term health condition were broadly similar for males and females. However, the proportions with deafness or partial hearing loss (particularly amongst those aged 50 and over) or with a learning disability, learning difficulty or developmental disorder (particularly amongst those aged under 25) were higher for males than for females. The proportion of females with a mental health condition was higher than for males at all age groups apart from those aged under 16.

Long-term health problem or disability by general health

  • Among people with a long-term health problem or disability, younger people were more likely to have reported their general health as being “Very good” or “Good”. For example, this proportion was 51 per cent for people aged under 16 compared to 14 per cent of those aged 85 and over.

Long-term health conditions by general health

  • Of the 1.6 million people in Scotland who reported one or more categories of long-term health condition in 2011, 49 per cent (776,000) reported their general health as being “Very good” or “Good”, 33 per cent (517,000) as “Fair” and 18 per cent (292,000) as “Bad” or “Very bad”. The proportion reporting their general health as “Bad” or “Very bad” was highest for those with a physical disability (43 per cent), a mental health condition (33 per cent) or blindness or partial sight loss (25 per cent).

Provision of unpaid care by age

· In 2011, 9 per cent (491,000) of the 5.2 million people living in households in Scotland provided unpaid care to family members, friends, neighbours or others because of long-term physical or mental ill health or problems related to old age. This proportion was 2 per cent for those aged under 25, 10 per cent for those aged 25 to 49, 17 per cent for those aged 50 to 64 and 11 per cent for those aged 65 and over.

The tables of census results covered in Release 3F are listed below. They are a mixture of “Detailed Characteristics” (DC) and “Local Characteristics” (LC) tables. DC versions of tables include the most complex cross-tabulations and are therefore not available at smaller geographic areas (generally available down to postcode sectors). LC versions of tables include less complex cross-tabulations and are therefore available down to the lowest geographic levels (generally census output areas). In some instances, no LC version of a table is produced as a statistical disclosure control measure. Similarly, the DC version of some tables is produced for council areas only.

Tables included in Release 3F

DC1120SC

Households with schoolchildren and full-time students away from home during term time by age and number of schoolchildren or students

DC1301SC

Household composition by number of people in household with a long-term health problem or disability

LC1301SC

Household composition by number of people in household with a long-term health problem or disability

DC2301SC

Ethnic group by provision of unpaid care by general health

LC2301SC

Ethnic group by provision of unpaid care by general health

DC2304SC

Country of birth by long-term health conditions

DC3101SC

Long-term health problem or disability by sex by age

LC3101SC

Long-term health problem or disability by age

DC3105SC

Provision of unpaid care by dependent children in family by family by family status

LC3105SC

Provision of unpaid care by dependent children in family by family by family status

DC3106SC

Long-term health conditions by sex by age

DC3201SC

Long-term health problem or disability by general health by ethnic group by sex by age

LC3205SC

Long-term health problem or disability by ethnic group by age

LC3206SC

General health by ethnic group by age

DC3301SC

Provision of unpaid care by general health by age

LC3301SC

Provision of unpaid care by general health by age

DC3302SC

Long-term health problem or disability by general health by sex by age

LC3302SC

Long-term health problem or disability by general health by age

DC3304SCca

Long-term health problem or disability by general health by age – People in communal establishments

DC3305SCca

Provision of unpaid care by long-term health conditions by age

DC3310SC

Long-term health conditions by general health

DC3402SCca

Long-term health problem or disability by communal establishment type by age

DC4404SC

Tenure by household size by number of rooms

All the data contained in this release can be accessed on the Scotland’s Census website (http://www.scotlandscensus.gov.uk ).